Tag: diy

DIY Home Audio Project – Tube Amp

by on May.04, 2012, under Electronics, Projects

Recently Roy and I set out to build set out to build a better headphone amplifier for our higher end Sennheiser headphones. A headphone amp simply boosts the power to the headphones a bit, this results in better sound on the bigger headphones. The design is built around a know design over at Diy Audio Projects. It is a Class A amplifier with a 12AU7 tube. We ended up puting a spin on the project and added a PCM2704 USB DAC (sound card). Sweet glowing tube action pictures are below.

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Adventures in Rapid Prototyping: Shaving Brush Stand

by on Apr.17, 2012, under Projects, Prusa

I have a badger-hair shaving brush that I’d like to keep for a while. I’ve read that the brush will last longer if it’s allowed to hang and dry versus being left sitting in the lather bowl. After looking around for a hanging stand I decided to make my own. My first model took over 6 hours to print at 60mm/sec.

Version 1 of my Badger-hair shaving brush stand

 It turns out I made the model quite a bit larger than necessary. After placing the brush and the razor on the stand, all the extra unused space is really evident.

Brush Stand V1 In Use

I decided to see how much time and material I could save on my next model so I tried to use circles and ellipses to minimize the printed area while still leaving enough structure. The new model has a hanger for the razor and a slot with drain holes for the extra razor blades.

Shaving Stand Version 2

This model printed much faster, it only took around two and a half hours at 60mm/sec.

Brush Stand V2

The stand works well enough, but I’m not happy with how tall and light it is, it’s too easy to knock over early in the morning.

Brush Stand V2 In Use

For the next iteration, I’m going to flare out the base a bit to prevent tipping and may increase the amount of material towards the bottom of the model. The blade storage slot needs to be deeper as well.

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Adventures in Rapid Prototyping: Banner Stand

by on Apr.17, 2012, under Projects, Prusa

We have a banner stand that is starting to fail at work. The plastic collar is starting to crack. Rather than simply replacing the whole stand, I figured I could make a quick replacement clamp. 10 minutes later thanks to TinkerCAD we have our replacement part model.

3D model for the replacement clamp

Once the stand was disassembled, I  switched out and replaced the collar. It’s a bit brighter than the stock part, but the stand is repaired!

Replacement rod clamp for collapsible banner stand

Once I saw how easy it was to create models in TinkerCad, I decided to get caught up with some of our other needs. This is a replacement clip for a hanging banner.

TinkerCad render of the replacement banner clip model

The original clip slides into a channel, the replacement slid right in!

Replacement clip for a hanging banner

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DIY Closet Desk by Nick

by on Dec.05, 2011, under Crafts, Projects, Woodworking

Nick sent out to our mailing list info about the closet desk for his home that he built up at the space, here’s what he had to say and some pictures of the project:

… I was up there into the wee hours of the night Saturday working on the ‘closet desk’ project I recently started.

I went out and got some 1×2 stick wood and a nice sheet of 7-ply birch for a desk surface from Lowe’s. Also some nice stain and sealant for later.
Up at the space, my pal and I ripped the plywood in half with the table saw and did some other long cuts to shape out the two halves appropriately: the desk surface and a shelf to go above it. We spent most of our time there setting up guides for cuts, and failing pretty comically with a jigsaw, plus sanding down all to-be-exposed surfaces nice and smooth.
Back home, the 1x2s were nailed into a closet that had been stripped of most of its shelving to make room. The 1x2s formed the frame on which we then rested the desk surface. I plan to use a similar method for the overhead shelf.
It’s untreated, if smooth. In a week or so, given time, I’d like to tear it back down to sand/stain/seal it all into a nice, deep finish. In the meantime, I’m sorta beta testing the design to identify any changes I want made before all that finishing work.
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Rep Rap Prusa Mendel 3d Printer

by on Jul.30, 2011, under Arduino, Projects, Prusa

Dan's Rep rap Prusa 3d Printer

Dan's Rep rap Prusa 3d Printer

I get a lot of blank stares and strange looks when I tell people that I am working on a 3D printer. As such I’d like to set out to explain what one is as well as show off what I’ve completed on mine thus far.

So you ask, “What exactly is one of them there 3-Dee printer things you’re talking about?” In short, it is a rapid prototyping machine. Since I’m sure that clears it all up and removes any further questions you have in your mind, I’m done here and everyone’s good to move on to the next blog right? No of course not. The best explanation I have is it’s a machine that takes a plastic material, melts it down, and places a thin layer of the melted plastic one layer at a time until you have a finished object. It is a printer that works like your old school inkjet printer but also moves on a 3rd axis to make non flat prints.

Claudio's RepRap Prusa

Claudio's RepRap Prusa

The idea is as follows. What do you do when you want to develop some brand new, earth shattering, world stopping, sign of the apocalypse product that has never been in existence before and it needs a custom part that even Nostradamus didn’t predict? You design it of course, in your favorite 3D modeling software like Google Sketchup or Blender or any of the other dozens that are out there. The show stopper before was how you went from a digital model to something tangible that you could hold in your hands and break if you are one of those accident prone individuals. It always meant that you had to go pay some exorbitant amount for a machine shop to make you just one of that item, and heaven forbid that item didn’t fit the needs on the first round. I’m sure you can imagine where the price would go up rather quickly in development. So why not just make it out of cheaper material and something that works just well enough to serve as a proof of concept. Well, that’s exactly what the 3D printer does for you.

A handful of months ago two of the other members at our hackerspace and myself all decided we wanted to build our own Prusa 3D printers. No real defined reason behind it other than we knew we wanted our own printers, and that if we had one it would open new possibilities to us. Since there is no real completion point for these things, it would simply be that once we had it “working” we could use it to create new items and repair or replace old ones that were no longer available. That in a nutshell is the appeal of having such a device and the driving force behind our continued development of them. One of the single most awesome things about this particular printer that we are building, the Prusa. Is that it’s relatively cheap, easily reproducible, modular, and upgradeable. Currently we are in the process of getting them fine tuned and working to some extent. From there we’ll be able to spend further time using it to upgrade itself and improve it’s quality. Expect to see more details in the near future right here on my very own blog enlightening all of the saga of blood, sweat, tears, cursing, and agony that is the way of life a homemade 3D prototyping machine is.

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Random Quote

Give me a lever long enough and a fulcrum on which to place it, and I shall move the world. — Archimedes